Geosystems Engineering

Dai Wins Prestigious NSF CAREER Award

Sheng Dai

Assistant Professor Sheng Dai has won a 2020 Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation.

Monday, March 2, 2020

Burns Named 2020 Engineer of the Year

Professor Susan Burns, associate chair of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech, has been selected as the 2020 Engineer of the Year by the Georgia Society of Professional Engineers.  

Monday, February 17, 2020

Researchers Receive $1.7 Million Grant to Build Robot for Sub-surface Soil Exploration

rendering of the proposed "Burrowing Robot with Integrated Sensing System"

An interdisciplinary research group from Georgia Tech has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to design an advanced self-propelled robot to explore the subsurface and record a range of signals as it advances.

 

Friday, December 6, 2019

NSF workshop sets out to define ‘bio-inspired geotechnics’ and lay groundwork for new collaborations

Alejandro Martinez welcomes engineers, biologists, physicists and others to the First International Workshop on Bio-Inspired Geotechnics in May at the University of California, Davis. The unique gathering aimed to better define the emerging field of bio-inspired geotechnics and connect researchers from a broad range of disciplines to collaborate on groundbreaking ideas in the area. (Photo: Noah Pflueger-Peters/UC Davis)

A melting pot of experts with research interests as diverse as geotechnical engineering, termite burrowing, tree physiology, granular physics and soft robotics trickled in from around the world in late May for the First International Workshop on Bio-Inspired Geotechnics. The NSF-funded workshop brought together 60 experts from engineering and science research, as well as industry, to foster dialogue and collaborations to better establish the field of bio-inspired geotechnics.

Friday, June 14, 2019

Unlocking the mystery of methane clathrates — on Earth and on our solar system’s icy moons

Structure of a methane clathrate block found embedded in sediment in the subduction zone off Oregon’s coast. A German research ship found this hydrate roughly 4,000 feet below the ocean’s surface in the top layer of the ocean floor. (Photo Courtesy: Wusel007 via Wikimedia Commons)

Trillions of cubic feet of natural gas are thought to lie in cold storage within Earth’s permafrost and under its oceans. That gas, however, is trapped within cage-like chemical structures called methane clathrates. Scientists are very interested in these structures, because they may have cousins hidden under the surface of the icy moons in the outer solar system.

Friday, April 19, 2019

VIDEO: Watch Bonaparte’s Terzaghi Lecture

Video screenshot of Rudy Bonaparte delivering the Karl Terzaghi Lecture on March 8, 2018. Split screen shows Bonaparte at a podium on the right and his title slide on the left, "Geotechnical Stability of Waste Fills – Lessons Learned and Continuing Challenges."

Professor of the Practice Rudy Bonaparte received the American Society of Civil Engineering Geo-Institute’s highest honor in 2018 when he was selected to deliver the Karl Terzaghi Lecture. The Geo-Institute now has posted video of Bonaparte’s presentation.

Friday, January 18, 2019

New faces: Macedo driven to understand geotechnical risks and make cities more resilient, sustainable

Assistant Professor Jorge Macedo

Though they’re relatively rare, the consequences of disasters like earthquakes, flooding and landslides are dire — and growing. Just ask Jorge Macedo, who thinks a lot about the risks to people, communities and engineering systems from those kinds of extreme events.

Wednesday, August 22, 2018

Geosynthetics Institute picks Hanumasagar for 2018 fellowship

Ph.D. student Sangy Hanumasagar, who has won a 2018 fellowship from the Geosynthetic Institute.

For the second consecutive year, a Georgia Tech civil engineering student is among the graduate students to receive a fellowship from the Geosynthetic Institute.

Wednesday, August 8, 2018

The next frontier in renewable energy: Dai aims to generate clean power from the earth’s heat

Geothermal plant. The Next Frontier in Renewable Energy: Hot rocks combine with water to create power. (Graphic: Sarah Collins)

In the next two decades, the world faces a yawning gap in the energy we produce and the energy we consume. The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Sheng Dai is working with the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy on one of the renewable sources that could help us make up ground: geothermal energy.

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

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