Faculty & Staff

NSF natural hazards group highlights Fritz’s unique volcanic landslide generator

The volcanic tsunami generator simulates a volcanic eruption by “punching” through the water’s surface. Professor Hermann Fritz built this one-of-a-kind setup and conducted a series of experiments to better understand tsunamis created by eruptions of underwater volcanoes. (Photo: Yibin Liu)

Last summer, Hermann Fritz was watching a miniature volcano erupt over and over again. The idea was to generate tsunamis from the eruption or a resulting landslide to see how these rare events differ from their more common earthquake-generated cousins.

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Rising tundra temperatures create worrying changes in microbial communities

Researchers studied the impact of warming on microbial communities in a tundra area near Denali National Park in Alaska. (Photo: Ted Schuur, Northern Arizona University)

Rising temperatures in the tundra of the Earth’s northern latitudes could affect microbial communities in ways likely to increase their production of greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide, a new study of experimentally warmed Alaskan soil suggests.

Monday, July 8, 2019

LISTEN: Clough shares new book, his explorations of Smithsonian archives on GPB’s On Second Thought

Screenshot of GPB story about G. Wayne Clough's new book, "Things Strange and New: A Southerner’s Journey through the Smithsonian Collections."

Georgia Tech President Emeritus G. Wayne Clough has been writing two books since he retired from the Smithsonian, including his newest exploring the vast collections of the world’s largest museum, education and research complex.

Tuesday, July 2, 2019

Taylor appointed associate chair of graduate programs

Frederick Law Olmstead John E. Taylor (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Professor John Taylor is joining the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s core group of faculty leadership.

Monday, July 1, 2019

New simulator puts people in a full-size car to understand their driving behavior

Ph.D. student Anye Zhou drives the new full-size simulator in Srinivas Peeta’s lab. The simulator is built from a 2013 Ford Focus and includes wraparound screens to immerse test drivers in the simulated environment. (Photo: Candler Hobbs)

When you take a seat in the 2013 Ford Fusion sitting in Srinivas Peeta’s new lab, you enter a virtual world where researchers can throw anything at you: snow and ice, detours, traffic snarls. All you have to do is drive — and in the process, help shape the future of transportation.

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Taylor, Watkins, Guin will help Columbus, Milton with smart communities projects

Angshuman Guin demonstrates how a cell phone tracks Gwinnett County Fire Department trucks and data about traffic to improve response times. Guin is working with Gwinnett on connected vehicle technology as part of the first round of Georgia Tech’s Georgia Smart Communities Challenge. (Photo: Allison Carter)

Georgia Tech’s Georgia Smart Communities Challenge named four new grants June 18 in Macon, including two led by School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers.

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Amekudzi-Kennedy elected to National Academy of Construction

Professor Adjo Amekudzi-Kennedy.

Adjo Amekudzi-Kennedy has joined the ranks of the nation’s most distinguished engineering and construction professionals as one of the newest members of the National Academy of Construction.

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

NSF workshop sets out to define ‘bio-inspired geotechnics’ and lay groundwork for new collaborations

Alejandro Martinez welcomes engineers, biologists, physicists and others to the First International Workshop on Bio-Inspired Geotechnics in May at the University of California, Davis. The unique gathering aimed to better define the emerging field of bio-inspired geotechnics and connect researchers from a broad range of disciplines to collaborate on groundbreaking ideas in the area. (Photo: Noah Pflueger-Peters/UC Davis)

A melting pot of experts with research interests as diverse as geotechnical engineering, termite burrowing, tree physiology, granular physics and soft robotics trickled in from around the world in late May for the First International Workshop on Bio-Inspired Geotechnics. The NSF-funded workshop brought together 60 experts from engineering and science research, as well as industry, to foster dialogue and collaborations to better establish the field of bio-inspired geotechnics.

Friday, June 14, 2019

AJC: New Tech center prepping for future where drones fly people over Atlanta traffic

Screenshot of Atlanta Journal-Constitution story "Could drones be the solution to Atlanta's traffic gridlock?" including a rendering of a city with a four-propeller Uber Eats drone flying above.

The first cities where drones could ferry people to and fro are the nation’s largest and most-congested — places like Los Angeles. But a new research center at Georgia Tech aims to answer the key questions about what’s called urban and regional air mobility, and turn Atlanta into a test bed for the emerging technology along the way.

Monday, May 27, 2019

New tool will give large concrete structures what amounts to an ultrasound, finding tiny cracks before they grow

A researcher measures the width of a crack in a reinforced concrete column after testing the strength of the column. A new project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Research Projects Agency will develop a field-deployable tool to detect cracks far smaller than this — and inside rather than outside — thick reinforced concrete structures. (Photo: Chris Kiser)

Imagine giving large concrete structures something similar to an ultrasound and getting images so detailed you can see cracks just a tenth of a millimeter long. That level of detail just isn’t possible now. Yet such capability could revolutionize how engineers assess the health of thick reinforced concrete infrastructure like dams and power plants and bridges.

Thursday, May 23, 2019

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